The artists: Cris Dumlao, Bea Lapa and Rebie Ramoso

TRANSITIONS

a joint exhibit by Rebie Ramoso, Bea Lapa, Cris Dumlao

Opening Night: 7PM, February 18, 2011 / exhibit runs from February 18-20, 2011

LRI Design Plaza, 210 Nicanor Garcia Street (Formerly Reposo), Bel-Air II, Makati City, Philippines 1209

Curator’s Notes:

Experiences of transition adversely vary from person to person. It is expansive. Transition can be interpreted in many ways. In the arts, transition is an important factor both as a rejoinder of two elements and a cue to signal change. It is integral in music, literature and, most notably, film as transitions methodically sew scenes, forming a visual narrative. The same fundamental approach is taken by three artists for this exhibition – each of them interpreting “transitions” as a theme and as an emotional tool for changes in their personal lives.

Do I Still Matter? by Rebie Ramoso (acrylic on canvas). 2ft. x 2ft.

"Do I Still Matter?" by Rebie Ramoso (acrylic on canvas).

The exhibit is more than personal though as it creatively documents the journeys of each of the featured artist. While Ramoso focuses to convey the multidimentionality of human emotion, Dumlao, whose works seemed systematically inspired by random experiences throughout a one year cycle, struggles to juggle an overwhelming emotional battle of adjustments, lamenting about losing one self in the process despite the occassional gains. Lapa dwells more on the process of transition, including her execution of works as part of an exploration in modifying what is deemed static.

FROM RIGHT TO LEFT: Rebie Ramoso's "Can I Make It?" (acrylic on canvas), followed by Bea Lapa's "Transitions" set (mixed media, acrylic emulsion on wood).

FROM RIGHT TO LEFT: Rebie Ramoso's "Can I Make It?" (acrylic on canvas), followed by Bea Lapa's "Transitions" set (mixed media, acrylic emulsion on wood).

In many ways, the three artists experiment with their dualities, experienced or otherwise, that is crucial in translating nuances, understanding relationships and undergoing painful experiences. When Lapa attempts to mix the organic and metaphysical with something that is spiritual and functional, she provides an interaction that creates new hues. The layered images of Ramoso, though imposing in many ways, does not provide cues to form specifics. Instead, it depicts transitory feelings superimposed by time and personal experiences. Dumlao’s play of seasons documents her journey towards knowledge amidst an emotional landscape. The works echoes alienation, longing, despair and hope.

FROM RIGHT TO LEFT: Cris Dumlao's "Transitions" Set of Seasons (digital paper collage on wood) followed by Rebie Ramoso's "Do I See You Again?" (acrylic on canvas)

FROM RIGHT TO LEFT: Cris Dumlao's "Transitions" Set of Seasons (digital paper collage on wood) followed by Rebie Ramoso's "Do I See You Again?" (acrylic on canvas)

Not surprisingly, What unites all the works of the three artists is their search for identity as individuals, struggling to find meaning amidst constant difficulties surrounding them. As in film wherein transition can be done in many ways so long as two scenes are juxtaposed with one another, this exhibit offers many possibilities of translating one recurring message: Change is constant.

— Prof. Elvert de la Cruz Bañares

 

Skysenshi’s Thoughts:

Many times throughout the night, I had been asked about my process. The first person who came into the room, when the exhibit had not yet opened, asked who did the photography. I am by no means a photographer, but at first glance, one might mistake my Transitions set for a bunch of lomo photographs.

Visual artist Kirby Roxas with Bea Lapa's "Notes on Form & Function" and "Notes on Organic Unity" (both mixed media, acrylic transfer on wood) in the background.

Visual artist Kirby Roxas with Bea Lapa's "Notes on Form & Function" and "Notes on Organic Unity" (both mixed media, acrylic transfer on wood) in the background.

Upon closer inspection, you’d notice that the wood I used had been carefully and painstakingly selected. I searched high and low for that perfect wood texture that would marry my images and acrylic emulsion together. The wood grain is part of the art, as well as the acrylic emulsion that I used to transfer my images from paper onto the wood.

The rest of the artworks I contributed to this exhibit had undergone pretty much the same process, which I will discuss in detail in a future post for art students who are interested in acrylic transfer.

Additional Notes:

As for selling…We originally weren’t thinking about selling our pieces. Our thought was that we wanted to exhibit among friends. But visitors who had dropped by out of curiosity had been asking us throughout the opening night (and even on the second day) if we were selling and how much so…if you’re interested in any of our works, you can reach us here.

Our very first guest. Fellow artist Mike Santos.

Our very first guest. Fellow artist Mike Santos.

Image Gallery (including Ramoso’s notes):

Complete photos of the entire event, including (decor, food and) guests, can be found in this Facebook album of Skysenshi’s Hermitage (Transitions Exhibit Day 1). Days 2 and 3 can also be found at the Facebook album.

Rebie also wrote a more in-depth version of her notes in her blog.